Opioid Addiction Treatment in Maine

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How Opioid Addiction Treatment Works in Maine

Man is comforted during group therapy at an opioid addiction treatment center

When someone mentions the state of Maine, most people think of lobster. Maine is known for its rocky coastline as well as its fishing and forestry industries. What many people don’t know about Maine is that it’s also one of the states hit hardest by the opioid epidemic.

The state is reported to have had over 2,700 opioid overdose-related deaths between 2010 and 2019. This means that, on average, there are about 275 deaths per year in Maine caused by opioids. In response to this public health crisis, the state has implemented a number of initiatives to try to reduce the number of overdose deaths. One of these initiatives is increasing access to treatment for opioid addiction. If you or someone you know is struggling with opioid addiction, there are a number of treatment options available in Maine.

Common Types of Opioids

There are a number of different types of opioids that people can become addicted to. The most common type of opioid is heroin. This is an illegal drug that is made from the poppy plant. Heroin is typically injected, snorted, or smoked, and it produces a feeling of euphoria.

Another common type of opioid is prescription painkillers. These are medications that are typically prescribed by a doctor to help manage pain. Some common types of prescription painkillers include oxycodone, hydrocodone and fentanyl. These medications can be highly addictive, and people often develop a tolerance to them, meaning that they need to take more of the drug to feel the same effects.

Fentanyl is especially dangerous because it is up to 50 times more potent than heroin, and it is often mixed with other drugs without the user’s knowledge. This can lead to accidental overdoses.

In Maine, there is also a problem with people using and abusing medications like Tylenol 3s. These are medications that contain the active ingredient acetaminophen, which is a pain reliever, and they also contain codeine. Tylenol 3s are not as potent as other prescription painkillers, but they can still be addictive and lead to overdose.

Signs and Symptoms of Opioid Addiction

It’s not always obvious when someone is struggling with opioid addiction. However, there are some common signs and symptoms to look out for if you suspect that you or someone you know may be using opioids. One of the most common signs of opioid addiction is a change in appearance. When you’re addicted to opioids, you may start to look tired and run down.

You may also lose weight, and your skin may take on a grayish hue. This is due to the fact that opioids can slow down your breathing and heart rate. You may also notice other changes in physical health if someone is addicted to opioids. Opioid addiction can cause constipation, nausea, and vomiting. It can also lead to respiratory problems and sleep disorders.

Secondly, you may notice a change in behavior if someone is addicted to opioids. When you’re using opioids, you may start to isolate yourself from friends and family. You may also start missing work or school, or you may stop participating in activities that you used to enjoy. Additionally, you may start to display signs of impulsivity and recklessness.

Thirdly, you may notice changes in your loved one’s mood if they are addicted to opioids. Opioid addiction can cause people to feel depressed, anxious, and irritable. You may also notice that the person seems more forgetful than usual.

Lastly, you may notice a change in financial status if someone is addicted to opioids. This is because addiction can be expensive, and people often spend a lot of money on drugs. You may also notice that the person is stealing money or selling possessions to get money to buy drugs.

How Can You Benefit from Treatment?

There are a number of different types of treatment available, and the type of treatment that’s right for you will depend on your individual needs. However, there are a few benefits that you can expect to experience from treatment no matter what type of treatment you choose.

One of the benefits of treatment is that you’ll have access to professionals who can help you through the process. These professionals will be able to provide you with support and guidance, and they can answer any questions you may have. Additionally, they can help you develop a plan for your recovery.

Another benefit of treatment is that you’ll be able to learn about your addiction and how to manage it. This is important because knowledge is power, and the more you know about your addiction, the better equipped you’ll be to manage it. You’ll also be able to learn about the resources that are available to you, which can help you in your recovery.

On top of all of this, treatment can also provide you with a sense of community. When you’re in treatment, you’ll be surrounded by people who are going through the same thing as you. This can provide you with a sense of support and belonging, which is essential for recovery.

Lastly, treatment can help you rebuild your life. Addiction can take a toll on every aspect of your life, but treatment can help you get back on track. You’ll be able to develop a plan for your future, and you’ll learn how to live a healthy and productive life.

The Treatment Process

The treatment process will vary depending on the type of treatment you choose. However, there are a few steps that are common to all types of treatment.

The first step is detox. This is when you’ll stop using opioids and allow your body to rid itself of the toxins that have built up. Detox can be a difficult process, and it’s important to have professional help during this time. The detox process can take a few days to a week, and you may experience withdrawal symptoms during this time.

The next step is behavioral therapy and counseling. This is when you’ll start to learn about your addiction and how to manage it. You’ll also start to work on developing healthy coping skills.

Behavioral therapy can be done in individual or group sessions, and it usually lasts for a few weeks. In behavioral therapy, you can expect to explore several methods, including cognitive behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing, and contingency management.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Cognitive behavioral therapy, or CBT, is a type of therapy that’s focused on changing the way you think about your addiction and your triggers. CBT can help you to identify your thoughts and beliefs about your addiction, and it can also help you to change these thoughts and beliefs. CBT usually lasts for around 12 weeks, and it’s typically done in individual sessions. However, you may also participate in group CBT.

Motivational Interviewing

Motivational interviewing is a type of therapy that’s focused on helping you to develop motivation for change. In motivational interviewing, you’ll work with a therapist to explore your thoughts and feelings about your addiction. The therapist will then help you to develop a plan for change. Motivational interviewing usually lasts for around eight to 12 weeks, and it’s typically done in individual sessions.

Contingency Management

Contingency management, or CM, is a type of therapy that uses rewards to help you stay on track with your treatment. In CM, you’ll work with a therapist to set up a system of rewards for meeting your treatment goals. For example, you may receive a voucher for every week that you attend all of your treatment sessions. CM usually lasts for around 12 weeks, and it typically takes place in individual or group sessions.

After you’ve completed behavioral therapy, you’ll also participate in aftercare planning. This is when you’ll develop a plan for maintaining your recovery after you leave treatment. Aftercare planning can help you to identify your triggers and how to avoid them. It can also help you to develop a support system of family and friends. The aftercare plan will be individualized to your needs, and it may last for several months or longer.

Types of Treatment

There are many different types of treatment available for opioid addiction. The type of treatment that’s right for you will depend on your individual needs and preferences.

Inpatient Treatment

Inpatient treatment is a type of treatment that’s provided in a residential setting. In inpatient treatment, you’ll live at the treatment facility and participate in treatment during the day. Inpatient treatment can last for a few weeks to several months.

Inpatient treatment is often recommended for people who have a severe addiction or who have relapsed after other types of treatment. It can also be helpful if you don’t have a support system at home or if your environment contributes to your use.

Outpatient Treatment

Outpatient treatment is a type of treatment that’s provided in an outpatient setting. During some programs, you’ll participate in treatment during the day and then return home in the evening. In other programs, you’ll attend school or work during the day and then attend a couple of hours of treatment at the facility during the evenings. You’ll still sleep at home. Outpatient treatment can last for a few weeks to several months.

Outpatient treatment is often recommended for people who have a less severe addiction or who have completed other types of treatment. Outpatient treatment can also be helpful if you have a support system at home.

Medication-assisted Treatment

Medication-assisted treatment is a type of treatment that’s provided in an outpatient or inpatient setting. In medication-assisted treatment, you’ll take medication to help reduce your cravings and withdrawal symptoms. Medication-assisted treatment typically lasts several years.

Medication-assisted treatment is often recommended for people who have a severe addiction or who have struggled to stay clean. People who get medication-assisted treatment are often prescribed medications like buprenorphine, naltrexone, and methadone.

How to Maintain a Healthy Recovery

One way to maintain your recovery is to stay connected to your treatment team. Treatment doesn’t end when you leave the facility; it’s important to continue working with your therapist or counselor and attending support groups.

Another way to maintain a healthy recovery is to build a support system for family and friends. These people can provide you with emotional support and help you stay on track.

It’s also important to develop healthy coping skills. Coping skills can help you deal with stress and triggers in a healthy way. Some healthy coping skills include exercise, journaling, and meditation.

Ultimately, recovery is a journey. It’s important to be patient with yourself and take things one day at a time.